New in Crime, Dark Fantasy, Literary Fiction, & Mark Twain

It’s your friends at Iambik here, with some summer listening selections that can be taken to the beach, shared on a crowded airplane, enjoyed on a trek through a foreign city, or indulged on the lawn of your own city’s nearest park.  Enjoy!

CRIME FICTION

Bound for Eternity coverBound for Eternity by Sarah Wisseman. Narrated by Priscilla Holbrook.
“Highly authentic, written by an archaeologist, BOUND FOR ETERNITY is a great read. The museum setting was both eerie and fascinating. I hope to see Lisa Donahue in many books to come.” — Barbara D’Amato, Chicago author of the Cat Marsala series

 

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY

Land at the End of the Working Day coverThe Land at the End of the Working Day by Peter Crowther. Narrated by Robert Keiper.  Published in print by PS Publishing.
“Peter Crowther with this excellent collection reminds us that, first of all he’s a terrific writer moving effortlessly across the various subgenres of dark fantasy, always providing evidence that what makes good fiction is the ability to tell in the right words what we feel about the mysteries of human life ,a fleeting light in the dark of an immense universe. ” – Trashotron.com

 

LITERARY FICTION

Skulk coverSkulk by Marc Estrin. Narrated by Anthony St. Pierre. Published in print by Progressive Press.
“Marc Estrin has his finger on the pulse of American madnesses. Contemplating 9/11 conspiracies would be no laughing matter except in the hands of a writer who once (INSECT DREAMS) resurrected and apotheosized Gregor Samsa’s discarded insect carcass. Now in SKULK, this master satririst raises questions of our national (ir)realities to breathless heights. As they used to say, “Right on!”  — Peter Glassgold – author of Angel Max, Anarchy!

 

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

Saving Angelfish coverThe Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain. Narrated by Tadhg Hynes.
“I read this one because my sixth grader is studying it in her English class.  At first I was a bit skeptical – the language is pretty archaic sometimes, but the more I read the more I could see that there is a lot of good things to discuss in this story.  About appreciating what we have.  About how we handle disappointment and misunderstanding.  About how being rich or poor does not determine whether or not we are good, honorable people.  About how our visible circumstances can dictate SO MANY of the assumptions people make about us. “  — The Book Nest

 

Audiobook reviewers, book bloggers, and Iambik ambassadors: as always, email Miette for review copies of any title.

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